An Important Step Towards the Moon

One of the very best things about human beings is how are always trying to get better. You see, when you are growing under all possible situations, what eventually happens is that you end up giving yourself a shot at achieving some huge milestones along the way. Now, while this has been proven right by everything we have achieved so far, nothing really backs it up quite like technology. Technology seems like clear-cut anomaly for a reason that goes beyond its unprecedented skill-set, and by that we are referring to the manner in which it would use those skills to impact our entire spectrum. In case the stated element wasn’t enough, the creation will also enjoy enormous success in terms of opening up new horizons over time. This, in particular, has been evident across a range of areas, and one among them is our global space industry. The constant developments within the space industry were a big reason why we were able to turn many pipe dreams into a reality. In fact, we are still far from done; at least that’s how it feels like once you look at a recent launch.

Rocket Lab has officially launched NASA’s 55-pound CAPSTONE cubesat, which is programmed to admit itself into a unique, elongated lunar orbit, an orbit NASA has never really explored before. According to certain reports, the idea here is to learn more about the stated space, and consequentially, make a decision on whether it’s an optimal avenue for future missions or not. Interestingly, the vehicle used in this mission is the first rocket to be electrically powered instead of running on a typical gas turbine. Furthermore, Rocket Lab made another notable addition by employing Lunar Photon upper stage that is said to have enough power to send the rocket deeper into the space. Assuming all goes as per the plan, it will be a big boost for NASA’s pursuit of sending humans back to moon. In a more actionable sense, the orbit could provide a viable location for building Gateway, which is basically a planned station for training and housing future astronauts.

CAPSTONE should reach NRHO (Near-Rectilinear Halo Orbit) around 13th November 2022, and once it gets there, the spacecraft will stay for about six-long months or more, therefore ensuring that NASA gets big enough of a sample size. During this time, NASA will also trial a new navigation setup. As a part of it, the spacecraft will try and determine its own position and speed in space. If the operation works, it can do a lot in reducing future spacecrafts’ dependency on external input from the ground.

“Today’s launch was an important step in humanity’s return to the Moon and a testament to the determination, resolve, and innovation of the hundreds of people behind CAPSTONE,” said Rocket Lab founder and CEO, Peter Beck. “Rocket Lab was founded to open access to space and enable ground-breaking missions like this that push the limits of what’s possible with small satellites. While CAPSTONE’s journey to the Moon has only just begun, we’re proud to have safely delivered CAPSTONE to space.”

 

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