The Digital Heist

Whether we like it or not, a human life is loaded with uncertainties. This is something we have learned time and time again over the years. Now, when you have such a volatile structure in play, it’s natural for things to wrong on some occasions, except there has to be a threshold. You see, once the emerging consequences start appearing as too detrimental, the whole setup turns into one big problem. Hence, to better position ourselves against the potential consequences, the world would develop dedicated avenues. These avenues were heavily centered on protecting us, and they all did a superb job of it, but none really did it better than technology. Technology races ahead rather comfortably for many reasons, with the most important one being the fact that it chose to protect humans by making them smarter. The move ended up paying off big time, as it opened up some real possibilities for us. However, while we reveled in technology’s by-products, what we failed to notice was how the creation had its own uncertainties. For instance, despite being so ingenious, it made the world vulnerable like nothing else. This realization seemed largely rooted in elements like questionable cybersecurity, and it has now turned into a proper concern, as we scramble to deal with a burgeoning community of cybercriminals. The said concern has, in fact, showed up quite a lot over the recent past, and it was there once again during a phishing attack on OpenSea.

OpenSea is officially investigating a phishing attack, which has robbed away many users’ access to their expensive digital tokens. According to PeckShield, the hacker targeted 32 accounts in total and stole over a whopping 254 NFTs. Considering the attack saw high-profile tokens like Ape Yacht Club and Azuki also getting stolen, the damages are expected to be great. If the figure touted by Molly White, the creator of the Web3 is Going Great blog, is factual, then the total losses fall around $1.7 million. Interestingly enough, OpenSea’s findings, so far, have revealed that its website was not the vector for the attack. Instead, it was the exploitation of Wyvern Protocol that really kickstarted the entire hullabaloo. By getting the users to sign partial agreements in relation to moving NFTs without any Ethereum change, the hacker practically gained complete access of their tokens, and the with that, the theft was successfully completed.

“I checked every transaction,” said the user, who goes by Neso. “They all have valid signatures from the people who lost NFTs so anyone claiming they didn’t get phished but lost NFTs is sadly wrong.”

 

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